Restorative Justice

Publications

Inspired by Peacemaking: Creating Community Based Restorative Programs in State Courts

Inspired by Peacemaking: Creating Community Based Restorative Programs in State Courts

By Erika Sasson and Nora Sydow

This document describes the Native American method of peacemaking—a non-adversarial form of justice focusing on restoration and the long-term healing of relationships—and offers detailed guidelines for implementation by state courts. The authors consider how incorporating peacemaking can help state courts strengthen public trust in justice by involving the community in settling disputes and help courts towards their goal of becoming more responsive to trauma in the populations they serve. The document profiles four peacemaking programs in state courts and concludes with stories of disputes brought before the Red Hook Peacemaking Program in Brooklyn, N.Y. Undertaken in collaboration with the National Center for State Courts, this document was prepared with support from the State Justice Institute.

Publications

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence? Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence? Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

By Erika Sasson

In May 2016, victim advocates, restorative justice practitioners, tribal peacemakers, prosecutors, federal policymakers, and others came together in Santa Fe, N.M., to discuss whether and how restorative practices could be used to safely and effectively respond to intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and dating violence. This document synthesizes a complex discussion into a series of themes for future reflection and planning around the issues raised. The national roundtable was convened by the Center for Court Innovation and the National Council for Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and was sponsored by the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

To Read the Monograph on the Same Topic

Publications

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence?

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence?

By Erika Sasson

This monograph explores whether and how restorative practices might be safe and effective as a response to intimate partner violence and provides practitioners with a series of questions to assist in developing key policies and principles for these interventions.

To Read the Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

Publications

Peacemaking Programs

Peacemaking Programs

This fact sheet provides an overview of the Center for Court Innovation’s Peacemaking Programs in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and Syracuse, N.Y. Peacemaking, inspired by a traditional Native American approach to justice, focuses on resolving disputes, restoring balance, and healing relationships among those affected by conflict and crime.

Audio

Strengthening Ties Between Police and the Community: A Conversation about Restorative Justice in Madison, Wisconsin

Strengthening Ties Between Police and the Community: A Conversation about Restorative Justice in Madison, Wisconsin

Joe Balles, who recently retired as a captain after a 30-year career with the Madison (Wisconsin) Police Department, discusses restorative justice and police legitimacy with Robert V. Wolf, director of communications at the Center for Court Innovation. A mentee of Herman Goldstein, considered the father of problem-oriented policing, Balles was instrumental in the creation of the Dane County Community Restorative Court, a diversion program based on the Native American principles of peacemaking. The interview took place during Community Justice 2016.

Publications

Advancing Community Justice: The Challenge of Brownsville, Brooklyn

Advancing Community Justice: The Challenge of Brownsville, Brooklyn

By Greg Berman

This monograph starts with a question: What can we do differently to enhance public safety, reduce the use of incarceration, and improve public perceptions of justice in a Brooklyn neighborhood that experiences both high crime and high rates of incarceration? The paper provides answers by looking at new reforms (including place-based interventions, procedural justice and new strategies for crime prevention) that have the potential to reduce offending, reengineer the relationship between the justice system and the public, and help activate a neighborhood’s capacity to help produce safety for itself.

Interviews

'Peace Must Begin With Me': An Interview with Syracuse Peacemaker Carl Thomas

'Peace Must Begin With Me': An Interview with Syracuse Peacemaker Carl Thomas

Carl Thomas is a trained volunteer peacemaker with the Near Westside Peacemaking Project, an initiative of the Syracuse office of the Center for Court Innovation. Thomas sat down with Sarah Reckess, director of the Syracuse office, to talk about his interest in peacemaking, the challenges of the work, and how the community can begin to heal itself.

Sarah Reckess: Why were you interested in being part of the Near Westside Peacemaking Project?

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Publications

Peacemaking Circles: Evaluating a Native American Restorative Justice Practice in a State Criminal Court Setting in Brooklyn

Peacemaking Circles: Evaluating a Native American Restorative Justice Practice in a State Criminal Court Setting in Brooklyn

By Suvi Hynynen Lambson

This study examines the work of the Red Hook Community Justice Center’s Peacemaking Program, which uses traditional Native American practices to resolve disputes. Participants can avoid the justice system by participating in peacemaking sessions and reaching a consensus agreement for restitution and repair.

Publications

Red Hook Peacemaking Program: A Different Voice

Red Hook Peacemaking Program: A Different Voice

By Erika Sasson

A description of the Peacemaking Program at the Red Hook Community Justice Center. Published on the Kindle Project blog in March 2013.

Read the Original Blog Post

Publications

A Different Approach to Justice

A Different Approach to Justice

By Erika Sasson

This article describes Native American peacemaking as an alternative to the Canadian justice system's "overreliance on punitive and isolationsist tactics." Published in Policy Options, February 2013.

Publications

Widening the Circle: Can Peacemaking Work in Non-Tribal Communities?

Widening the Circle: Can Peacemaking Work in Non-Tribal Communities?

By Robert V. Wolf

A guide for justice planners seeking to adapt Native American peacemaking to a non-tribal setting. After providing an overview of peacemaking, the report outlines key issues jurisdictions will most likely want to consider during planning and implementation.

Articles

Families and the Courts: New Thinking podcasts on kids, parents, and the criminal justice system

Families and the Courts: New Thinking podcasts on kids, parents, and the criminal justice system

Can the justice system make a positive difference in a family? Can courts promote healthy relationships between parents and children? These New Thinking podcasts give inside views of innovations for youth and families involved in the justice system. Interviews with experts and practitioners on the front-lines of criminal justice research and reform address topics such as: youth courts and restorative justice; immigration and some of the complex familial issues non-citizen survivors of domestic violence face; the Adolescent Diversion Program, an initiative expanding the justice system's options for dealing with 16- and 17-year-old defendants; and the Parent Support Program, which helps non-custodial parents find employment and support their children.

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Interviews

Taking Responsibility: A Conversation on Restorative Justice and Youth

Taking Responsibility: A Conversation on Restorative Justice and Youth

Dr. Mara Schiff, an associate professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida Atlantic University, focuses her work on restorative justice, community justice, and juvenile justice. Here, she gives on overview of restorative practices and discusses why a restorative approach can be particularly valuable for youth. (October 2012)

Audio

'Each One's a Success When They Walk Through That Door': Creating and Sustaining a Tribal Peacemaking Program

'Each One's a Success When They Walk Through That Door': Creating and Sustaining a Tribal Peacemaking Program

Peacemaker Administrator Anna Francis-Jack discusses tribal history and how The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation in Washington State have launched and grown their peacemaking program. May 2012

Interviews

Peacemaking: How Native American Elders Use Tradition to Support Offender Reintegration

Peacemaking: How Native American Elders Use Tradition to Support Offender Reintegration

During a visit by the Tribal Justice Exchange to the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation in Washington State, Robert V. Wolf talks with two elders--Matthew Dick Jr. and Darlene Wilder--and a client about peacemaking, a traditional Native American approach to resolving both criminal and civil issues. May 2012

Contact
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