Violence Prevention

Publications

What Courts Should Know: Trends in Intervention Programming for Abusive Partners

What Courts Should Know: Trends in Intervention Programming for Abusive Partners

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser

Programs that work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence are changing as practitioners across the United States employ new strategies to improve outcomes for both offenders and survivors. Courts and judges have an opportunity to build on this exciting time of change. This document describes the innovative approaches to risk assessment, treatment modality, compliance, and procedural fairness that intervention programs for abusive partners are using to enhance victim safety and offender accountability.

Publications

Co-Producing Public Safety: Communities, Law Enforcement, and Public Health Researchers Work to Prevent Crime Together

Co-Producing Public Safety: Communities, Law Enforcement, and Public Health Researchers Work to Prevent Crime Together

By Sarah Schweig, Nazmia E.A. Comrie and John Markovic

A number of jurisdictions across the U.S. are seeking ways to understand and prevent violence with a broader multidisciplinary approach, treating violence collaboratively as both a public health issue and a crime problem. This report summarizes the results of a roundtable conversation on the topic of public health and law enfrocement collaborations. The roundtable was convened by The California Endowment, the Center for Court Innovation, and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. 

Publications

Responding to Trauma Among Young Men of Color

Responding to Trauma Among Young Men of Color

By Katie Crank and Kenton Kirby

This planning toolkit is a blueprint for communities, violence interrupter programs, and traditional victim service providers that want to improve their responses to young men of color who have experienced trauma.

Publications

The Brownsville Anti-Violence Project: Evaluation Findings

The Brownsville Anti-Violence Project: Evaluation Findings

By Elise Jensen, Rachel Swaner, Sarah Picard-Fritsche and Suvi Hynynen Lambson

This report presents findings from an evaluation of the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project. The project was designed to reduce gun violence through focused deterrence aimed at high-risk parolees and their community networks, paired with efforts to present the justice system as fair and legitimate. Findings revealed that those exposed to such programming were less likely to report carrying, owning, or using a gun and more likely to view law enforcement as legitimate. However, a separate impact evaluation, summarized in the report, found the Project had no significant effect on rates of violent crime in Brownsville. Implications for gun violence prevention and research are discussed.

Publications

Commitment to Extremist Ideology: Using Factor Analysis to Move beyond Binary Measures of Extremism

By Ashmini Kerodal, Joshua D. Freilich and Steven M. Chermak

Using data from the United States Extremist Crime Database, the study identifies four subtypes of far-right extremists: Conspiracy Theorist, Survivalist, Proud Far-Rightist, and Movement Participant. The paper further assesses which components of far-right extremist ideology are most related to criminal behavior. Findings reveal distinct beliefs associated with financial (conspiratorial, anti-government, anti-tax beliefs) as opposed to violent (xenophobic, survivalist, anti-gun control beliefs) crime. Published in Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 39: 7-8 (2016).

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Publications

Advancing Community Justice: The Challenge of Brownsville, Brooklyn

Advancing Community Justice: The Challenge of Brownsville, Brooklyn

By Greg Berman

This monograph starts with a question: What can we do differently to enhance public safety, reduce the use of incarceration, and improve public perceptions of justice in a Brooklyn neighborhood that experiences both high crime and high rates of incarceration? The paper provides answers by looking at new reforms (including place-based interventions, procedural justice and new strategies for crime prevention) that have the potential to reduce offending, reengineer the relationship between the justice system and the public, and help activate a neighborhood’s capacity to help produce safety for itself.

Publications

Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit

Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit

The Center for Court Innovation and the United States Department of Justice COPS Office developed the Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit as a resource for communities hoping to foster conversations between young people and the police, enabling them to discuss their interactions and find common ground. Drawing from projects across the country, the toolkit consolidates expertise, providing strategies and promising practices for police-youth dialogues.

Publications

Combatting Domestic Violence in Indian Country: Are Specialized Domestic Violence Courts Part of the Solution?

Combatting Domestic Violence in Indian Country: Are Specialized Domestic Violence Courts Part of the Solution?

By Kathryn Ford

Domestic violence is one of the most pressing problems facing Native American and Alaska Native communities. Although the reauthorized Violence Against Women Act recognizes the authority of tribes to prosecute non-Native offenders, more tools are needed. This paper explores whether specialized domestic violence courts, which focus on enhancing victim safety and promoting offender accountability, can be part of a multi-faceted approach for tribal justice systems to address domestic violence.

 

Publications

Stepping Up: Strengthening Police, Youth, and Community Relationships

Stepping Up: Strengthening Police, Youth, and Community Relationships

By Members of the Youth Justice Board

This report, researched and presented by the 2014-15 Youth Justice Board, focuses on how teenagers with prior arrests can benefit from meaningful interventions and avoid further justice system involvement. It also provides recommendations to strengthen police-youth relationships in New York City. 

Publications

Defending Childhood Demonstration Program

Defending Childhood Demonstration Program

In order to address the high prevalence of children’s exposure to violence, in 2010, eight sites around the country were selected by the U.S. Department of Justice for the Defending Childhood Demonstration Program. This national initiative aims: 1) to prevent children’s exposure to violence; 2) to mitigate the negative impact of such exposure when it does occur; and 3) to develop knowledge and spread awareness about children’s exposure to violence, both within and beyond the chosen pilot sites. The eight demonstration sites are:

Listen to an interview with the Researchers

Listen to an interview with the Cuyahoga County Defending Childhood Initiative team

Listen to an Interview with members of the Grand Forks County Defending Childhood Initiative team

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Publications

Through the NOVA Door: A Process Evaluation of Shelby County’s Defending Childhood Initiative

Through the NOVA Door: A Process Evaluation of Shelby County’s Defending Childhood Initiative

By Elise Jensen and Rachel Swaner

The Shelby County Defending Childhood Initiative, known as the Network for Overcoming Violence and Abuse (NOVA), used a place-based approach to target children and families exposed to violence in three apartment complexes in the Frayser and Hickory Hill neighborhoods of Memphis. The initiative placed staff in apartment complexes to conduct outreach to children and families in need, and, through case management and advocacy, to refer families to necessary services for therapeutic treatment. Other project components included community awareness campaigns, professional training on topics such as children’s exposure to violence and data confidentiality, and the creation of a shared data management system. (April 2015)

Publications

Nawicakiciji – Woasniye – Oaye Waste: A Process Evaluation of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe’s Defending Childhood Initiative

Nawicakiciji – Woasniye – Oaye Waste: A Process Evaluation of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe’s Defending Childhood Initiative

By Rachel Swaner

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe Defending Childhood Initiative incorporated the Lakota way of life in all of its programming and approaches and viewed bringing back Lakota culture as a form of prevention work. The Rosebud DCI model focused heavily on providing case management services for children who have been exposed to violence. Staff facilitated traditional healing ceremonies and made referrals to culturally appropriate treatment, as well provided court- and school-based advocacy. Additionally, the initiative focused on bringing awareness about children’s exposure to violence and available resources to the different communities and schools on the reservation. Finally, staff worked to revise tribal legislation and policy to be more responsive to children’s exposure to violence. (April 2015)

Publications

Love One Another and Take Care of Each Other: A Process Evaluation of the Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project

Love One Another and Take Care of Each Other: A Process Evaluation of the Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project

By Lama Hassoun Ayoub

Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project was informed by a commitment to culture as prevention—reconnecting youth and families with the Chippewa Cree language, culture, and traditions. The primary components of the initiative were advocacy and case management for children and families coping with exposure to violence; crisis intervention services; treatment referrals; traditional healing ceremonies; and community awareness and education activities. (April 2015)

Publications

Tackling Urban Inequalities: A Process Evaluation of the Boston Defending Childhood Initiative

Tackling Urban Inequalities: A Process Evaluation of the Boston Defending Childhood Initiative

By Lama Hassoun Ayoub

The Boston Defending Childhood Initiative centralized the importance of racial/social justice and health equity during planning and implementation in nearly every approach for addressing children’s exposure to violence. Specific strategies included funding community health centers to provide treatment for children exposed to violence; funding local community organizations to implement family nurturing programs; creating a youth-led and produced web series to raise awareness about violence; and engaging professionals (e.g., through “learning communities”) in long-term training on topics related to trauma-informed care and evidence-based therapeutic interventions. (April 2015)

Contact
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  • phone: 646.386.3100
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  • 601 Tully Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13204
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  • phone: +44 2076.329.060