Access to Justice

Publications

Cultural Responsiveness and the Courts

Cultural Responsiveness and the Courts

For a justice system to be truly just, it must be accessible to all individuals. However, litigants may face challenges when courts are not responsive to their cultural identity. For survivors of domestic violence, these challenges present additional barriers towards accessing justice and obtaining fair outcomes. This viewers' guide serves as a companion to the short video Building a Culture of Justice, which explains how justice-system staff and stakeholders can serve litigant needs by implementing culturally responsive practices in courts handling domestic violence cases.

Publications

Understanding the Civil Legal Needs of Crown Heights Residents: A Community Survey in Brooklyn

Understanding the Civil Legal Needs of Crown Heights Residents: A Community Survey in Brooklyn

By Warren A. Reich, Elise Jensen, Michael Diller, Ignacio Jaureguilorda and Lauren Speigel

Undertaken to inform the work of the Center for Court Innovation’s Legal Hand project, this street-intercept study in Crown Heights, Brooklyn documents the most common civil legal needs facing the community, and how, if at all, community members address these needs. The study found the most common needs involved housing and employment. Very few respondents mentioned seeking assistance from an attorney. Indeed, many did not know how or where to find legal assistance. These results suggest a need for “one-stop shop” services that can assist clients with a range of complex legal problems.

Publications

Navigating the Bail Payment System in New York City: Findings and Recommendations

Navigating the Bail Payment System in New York City: Findings and Recommendations

By Elise White, Melissa Labriola, Ashmini G. Kerodal, Elise Jensen and Michael Rempel

This report documents the bail payment process in New York City courts and correctional facilities and provide 17 recommendations to improve practices. Based on these recommendations, the city is working to launch the first-ever online bail payment system in partnership with the state courts and has begun implementing a number of other solutions detailed here. Approximately 16,000 individuals per year are bailed out of Department of Correction facilities in New York City, in most cases requiring family or friends to make the sometimes lengthy and costly journey to city jails. Continuing to simplify the bail payment process could greatly reduce the number of short jail stays resulting solely from the difficulty of paying bail at arraignment. This report received funding from the Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice.

Publications

Improving Compliance Through Respect and Procedural Fairness

Improving Compliance Through Respect and Procedural Fairness

In this article in the Office of Child Support Enforcement’s Child Support Report, Liberty Aldrich, director of domestic violence and family court programs at the Center for Court Innovation, explains how a court-based problem-solving approach to child support cases can increase child support payments, reduce negative consequences, and build healthy parent-child relationships.

Publications

Fact sheet: Poverty Justice Solutions

Fact sheet: Poverty Justice Solutions

This fact sheet summarizes the mission of Poverty Justice Solutions, an initiative that seeks to close the justice gap in New York City by expanding the pool of attorneys available to represent low-income New Yorkers in Housing Court and apply an innovative problem-solving approach to housing court matters across the city.

Publications

Domestic Violence Online Petition Program

Domestic Violence Online Petition Program

An overview of the Domestic Violence Online Petition Program, which seeks to improve victim safety by allowing a petitioner—with help from a trained domestic violence advocate—to use the internet to file the application for an order of protection.

Publications

The Effects of the Harlem Housing Court on Tenant Perceptions of Justice

The Effects of the Harlem Housing Court on Tenant Perceptions of Justice

By Rashida Abuwala and Donald J. Farole, Jr.

This study examines the perceptions of self-represented tenants in an innovative housing court at the Harlem Community Justice Center. Harlem tenants viewed the experience in more positive terms than litigants in a conventional court, in large part because they were more likely to perceive the court process and outcome as fair.

Contact
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