Domestic Violence

Publications

10 Things Courts Should Know About Their Local Intervention Programs for Abusive Partners

10 Things Courts Should Know About Their Local Intervention Programs for Abusive Partners

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser

This two-page handout designed for courts including programming for abusive partners in their case dispositions lists the 10 most important questions court staff should ask as they consider making referrals and provides general information on national best practices.

Publications

Intimate Partner Violence as a Community Problem: Community Perspectives from Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

Intimate Partner Violence as a Community Problem: Community Perspectives from Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

By Suvi Hynynen Lambson and Warren A. Reich

This study documents perceptions of intimate partner violence in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Using community surveys and focus groups, researchers found just over a third of community members surveyed perceived intimate partner violence to be a major problem in the community. The study also examines some residents’ conflicting feelings about calling for police intervention and the perceived absence of alternatives. It concludes with recommendations to decrease the incidence of intimate partner violence in the Bedford-Stuyvesant community, including: increased education about intimate partner violence; greater attention to the different ways women and men experience and are affected by it; addressing cultural norms about violence; and improving trust in law enforcement.

Publications

What Courts Should Know: Trends in Intervention Programming for Abusive Partners

What Courts Should Know: Trends in Intervention Programming for Abusive Partners

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser

Programs that work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence are changing as practitioners across the United States employ new strategies to improve outcomes for both offenders and survivors. Courts and judges have an opportunity to build on this exciting time of change. This document describes the innovative approaches to risk assessment, treatment modality, compliance, and procedural fairness that intervention programs for abusive partners are using to enhance victim safety and offender accountability.

Interviews

Using Volunteers to Evaluate the Courtroom Experience: A Conversation about CourtWatch of King County, Wash.

Using Volunteers to Evaluate the Courtroom Experience: A Conversation about CourtWatch of King County, Wash.

Court observation programs around the country send volunteers into courts to observe, collect data, and sometimes issue reports about what they've seen. Their goals include keeping courts accountable to the public and improving transparency, but not all courts are eager to receive public feedback. CourtWatch of King County, Washington, has worked closely with its local courts since the program's founding, trying to build a relationship that is more collaborative than adversarial. As Laura Jones, manager, and Mary Laskowski, services and outreach coordinator, explain to New Thinking host Robert V. Wolf, this collaborative approach has allowed CourtWatch to support judges and court administrators in efforts to improve the court experience for everyone.

Publications

Adapting Deterrence Strategies for Domestic Violence Offenders

Adapting Deterrence Strategies for Domestic Violence Offenders

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser and Nida Abbasi

Recent research has uncovered promising strategies for deterring recidivism among domestic violence offenders. Courts across various jurisdictions promote effective deterrence by engaging in evidence-based strategies such as judicial monitoring and imposing certain and consistent consequences in response to non-compliance. This fact sheet describes the concept of deterrence and how it can be implemented in domestic violence cases to enhance victim safety and hold offenders accountable

Publications

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence? Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence? Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

By Erika Sasson

In May 2016, victim advocates, restorative justice practitioners, tribal peacemakers, prosecutors, federal policymakers, and others came together in Santa Fe, N.M., to discuss whether and how restorative practices could be used to safely and effectively respond to intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and dating violence. This document synthesizes a complex discussion into a series of themes for future reflection and planning around the issues raised. The national roundtable was convened by the Center for Court Innovation and the National Council for Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and was sponsored by the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

To Read the Monograph on the Same Topic

Publications

Cultural Responsiveness and the Courts

Cultural Responsiveness and the Courts

For a justice system to be truly just, it must be accessible to all individuals. However, litigants may face challenges when courts are not responsive to their cultural identity. For survivors of domestic violence, these challenges present additional barriers towards accessing justice and obtaining fair outcomes. This viewers' guide serves as a companion to the short video Building a Culture of Justice, which explains how justice-system staff and stakeholders can serve litigant needs by implementing culturally responsive practices in courts handling domestic violence cases.

Video

Building a Culture of Justice: How Courts are Improving Access and Understanding in Domestic Violence Cases

Building a Culture of Justice: How Courts are Improving Access and Understanding in Domestic Violence Cases

For a justice system to be truly just, it must be accessible to all individuals. However, litigants may face challenges when courts are not responsive to their cultural identities. For survivors of domestic violence, these challenges present additional barriers to accessing justice and obtaining fair outcomes. Watch Building a Culture of Justice and read the viewers' guide to learn how justice-system staff and stakeholders can serve litigant needs by implementing culturally-responsive practices in courts handling domestic violence cases.

Publications

Integrating Procedural Justice in Domestic Violence Cases

Integrating Procedural Justice in Domestic Violence Cases

This fact sheet explains the concept of procedural justice and offers a few simple strategies for courts and domestic violence stakeholders to enhance procedural justice and improve outcomes for both victims and defendants.

Publications

Enhancing Collaboration Between Domestic Violence Courts and Supervised Visitation Services

Enhancing Collaboration Between Domestic Violence Courts and Supervised Visitation Services

By Nida Abbasi, Kathryn Ford, Robyn Mazur and Liberty Aldrich

An addendum to the Center’s Creating a Domestic Violence Court planning toolkit, this document focuses on enhancing the collaboration between courts handling domestic violence cases and supervised visitation and exchange programs. Offering a comprehensive step-by-step process, the addendum advises court staff and stakeholders on creating an effective relationship with supervised visitation centers or improving an existing one.

Audio

Fairness, Procedural Justice, and Domestic Violence: A Conversation with Judge Jeffrey Kremers

Fairness, Procedural Justice, and Domestic Violence: A Conversation with Judge Jeffrey Kremers

In this New Thinking podcast, Judge Jeffrey Kremers of the Milwaukee County Circuit Court brings procedural justice to bear on domestic violence. Sharing his insights from the bench, Judge Kremers talks about the importance of procedural justice for both defendants and survivors as well as their families, and discusses strategies for addressing the unique challenges posed by domestic violence cases.

This product was supported by Grant No. 2015-TA-AX-K023 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, or recommendations expressed in this podcast are those of the speaker(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

Audio

 'My Partner, My Enemy': New York State Judge John Leventhal

'My Partner, My Enemy': New York State Judge John Leventhal

Judge John Leventhal is the author of “My Partner, My Enemy,” a book chronicling his experiences presiding over the Brooklyn Domestic Violence Court, the first felony domestic violence court in the nation. In this New Thinking podcast, Judge Leventhal discusses memorable cases from his tenure, the domestic violence court model, and why he felt it was important to write a book about domestic violence. Judge Leventhal presided over the Brooklyn Domestic Violence Court from its opening in June 1996 until 2008. Since 2008, he has served as an associate justice of the New York State Supreme Court in the second department of the appellate division.

Interviews

'My Partner, My Enemy': New York State Judge John Leventhal

'My Partner, My Enemy': New York State Judge John Leventhal

Judge John Leventhal is the author of “My Partner, My Enemy,” a book chronicling his experiences presiding over the Brooklyn Domestic Violence Court, the first felony domestic violence court in the nation. In this New Thinking podcast, Judge Leventhal discusses memorable cases from his tenure, the domestic violence court model, and why he felt it was important to write a book about domestic violence. Judge Leventhal presided over the Brooklyn Domestic Violence Court from its opening in June 1996 until 2008. Since 2008, he has served as an associate justice of the New York State Supreme Court in the second department of the appellate division.


 

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Publications

The Windham County Integrated Domestic Violence Docket: A Process Evaluation of Vermont’s Second Domestic Violence Court

The Windham County Integrated Domestic Violence Docket: A Process Evaluation of Vermont’s Second Domestic Violence Court

By Amanda Cissner, Rebecca Thomforde Hauser and Nida Abbasi

The Windham County Integrated Domestic Violence Docket in Vermont is only the second such court in the state. This process evaluation includes an overview of the court planning process and operations, including goals and key principles, and a summary of stakeholder insights as they pertain to each of the key principles. The report concludes with recommendations both to enhance the court and to assist other jurisdictions wishing to adopt an integrated approach to addressing domestic violence. In particular, the project's use of universal, free legal counsel in civil proceedings, on-site mental health and substance abuse services, and enhanced courthouse safety provisions are highlighted as promising practices.

Articles

Effective Court Communication: Assessing the  Need for Language Access Services for Limited  English Proficient Litigants in Domestic Violence,  Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking Cases

Effective Court Communication: Assessing the Need for Language Access Services for Limited English Proficient Litigants in Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking Cases

Ensuring meaningful access to justice for Limited English Proficient (LEP) litigants is an essential responsibility of the justice system. To gauge the status of language access services for litigants in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, the Center for Court Innovation and the National Center for State Courts conducted a needs assessment of courts, government agencies, and community-based organizations in the fall of 2013. This report outlines the findings and makes recommendations for strengthening language access.

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