Domestic Violence

Publications

10 Things Courts Should Know About Their Local Intervention Programs for Abusive Partners

10 Things Courts Should Know About Their Local Intervention Programs for Abusive Partners

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser

This two-page handout designed for courts including programming for abusive partners in their case dispositions lists the 10 most important questions court staff should ask as they consider making referrals and provides general information on national best practices.

Publications

Intimate Partner Violence as a Community Problem: Community Perspectives from Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

Intimate Partner Violence as a Community Problem: Community Perspectives from Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

By Suvi Hynynen Lambson and Warren A. Reich

This study documents perceptions of intimate partner violence in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Using community surveys and focus groups, researchers found just over a third of community members surveyed perceived intimate partner violence to be a major problem in the community. The study also examines some residents’ conflicting feelings about calling for police intervention and the perceived absence of alternatives. It concludes with recommendations to decrease the incidence of intimate partner violence in the Bedford-Stuyvesant community, including: increased education about intimate partner violence; greater attention to the different ways women and men experience and are affected by it; addressing cultural norms about violence; and improving trust in law enforcement.

Publications

What Courts Should Know: Trends in Intervention Programming for Abusive Partners

What Courts Should Know: Trends in Intervention Programming for Abusive Partners

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser

Programs that work with perpetrators of intimate partner violence are changing as practitioners across the United States employ new strategies to improve outcomes for both offenders and survivors. Courts and judges have an opportunity to build on this exciting time of change. This document describes the innovative approaches to risk assessment, treatment modality, compliance, and procedural fairness that intervention programs for abusive partners are using to enhance victim safety and offender accountability.

Publications

Adapting Deterrence Strategies for Domestic Violence Offenders

Adapting Deterrence Strategies for Domestic Violence Offenders

By Rebecca Thomforde Hauser and Nida Abbasi

Recent research has uncovered promising strategies for deterring recidivism among domestic violence offenders. Courts across various jurisdictions promote effective deterrence by engaging in evidence-based strategies such as judicial monitoring and imposing certain and consistent consequences in response to non-compliance. This fact sheet describes the concept of deterrence and how it can be implemented in domestic violence cases to enhance victim safety and hold offenders accountable

Publications

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence? Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

Can Restorative Practices Address Intimate Partner Violence? Summary of a Roundtable Discussion

By Erika Sasson

In May 2016, victim advocates, restorative justice practitioners, tribal peacemakers, prosecutors, federal policymakers, and others came together in Santa Fe, N.M., to discuss whether and how restorative practices could be used to safely and effectively respond to intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and dating violence. This document synthesizes a complex discussion into a series of themes for future reflection and planning around the issues raised. The national roundtable was convened by the Center for Court Innovation and the National Council for Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and was sponsored by the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

To Read the Monograph on the Same Topic

Publications

Cultural Responsiveness and the Courts

Cultural Responsiveness and the Courts

For a justice system to be truly just, it must be accessible to all individuals. However, litigants may face challenges when courts are not responsive to their cultural identity. For survivors of domestic violence, these challenges present additional barriers towards accessing justice and obtaining fair outcomes. This viewers' guide serves as a companion to the short video Building a Culture of Justice, which explains how justice-system staff and stakeholders can serve litigant needs by implementing culturally responsive practices in courts handling domestic violence cases.

Publications

Integrating Procedural Justice in Domestic Violence Cases

Integrating Procedural Justice in Domestic Violence Cases

This fact sheet explains the concept of procedural justice and offers a few simple strategies for courts and domestic violence stakeholders to enhance procedural justice and improve outcomes for both victims and defendants.

Publications

Enhancing Collaboration Between Domestic Violence Courts and Supervised Visitation Services

Enhancing Collaboration Between Domestic Violence Courts and Supervised Visitation Services

By Nida Abbasi, Kathryn Ford, Robyn Mazur and Liberty Aldrich

An addendum to the Center’s Creating a Domestic Violence Court planning toolkit, this document focuses on enhancing the collaboration between courts handling domestic violence cases and supervised visitation and exchange programs. Offering a comprehensive step-by-step process, the addendum advises court staff and stakeholders on creating an effective relationship with supervised visitation centers or improving an existing one.

Publications

The Windham County Integrated Domestic Violence Docket: A Process Evaluation of Vermont’s Second Domestic Violence Court

The Windham County Integrated Domestic Violence Docket: A Process Evaluation of Vermont’s Second Domestic Violence Court

By Amanda Cissner, Rebecca Thomforde Hauser and Nida Abbasi

The Windham County Integrated Domestic Violence Docket in Vermont is only the second such court in the state. This process evaluation includes an overview of the court planning process and operations, including goals and key principles, and a summary of stakeholder insights as they pertain to each of the key principles. The report concludes with recommendations both to enhance the court and to assist other jurisdictions wishing to adopt an integrated approach to addressing domestic violence. In particular, the project's use of universal, free legal counsel in civil proceedings, on-site mental health and substance abuse services, and enhanced courthouse safety provisions are highlighted as promising practices.

Publications

The Intersection of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking

The Intersection of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking

This fact sheet explores the complex relationship between domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking and offers strategies for developing effective justice-system responses.

Publications

FACT SHEET: Erie Risk Assessment Pilot

FACT SHEET: Erie Risk Assessment Pilot

This document summarizes early results from a pilot program in Upstate New York that is testing the efficacy of the Domestic Violence Risk Factor Guide for Judges, a risk-assessment tool designed to allow judges to view language in a petition through the lens of risk factors, to gather additional information as needed, and to apply case law and remedies to address the risk indicated by the petition. 

Publications

Combatting Domestic Violence in Indian Country: Are Specialized Domestic Violence Courts Part of the Solution?

Combatting Domestic Violence in Indian Country: Are Specialized Domestic Violence Courts Part of the Solution?

By Kathryn Ford

Domestic violence is one of the most pressing problems facing Native American and Alaska Native communities. Although the reauthorized Violence Against Women Act recognizes the authority of tribes to prosecute non-Native offenders, more tools are needed. This paper explores whether specialized domestic violence courts, which focus on enhancing victim safety and promoting offender accountability, can be part of a multi-faceted approach for tribal justice systems to address domestic violence.

 

Publications

Defending Childhood Demonstration Program

Defending Childhood Demonstration Program

In order to address the high prevalence of children’s exposure to violence, in 2010, eight sites around the country were selected by the U.S. Department of Justice for the Defending Childhood Demonstration Program. This national initiative aims: 1) to prevent children’s exposure to violence; 2) to mitigate the negative impact of such exposure when it does occur; and 3) to develop knowledge and spread awareness about children’s exposure to violence, both within and beyond the chosen pilot sites. The eight demonstration sites are:

Listen to an interview with the Researchers

Listen to an interview with the Cuyahoga County Defending Childhood Initiative team

Listen to an Interview with members of the Grand Forks County Defending Childhood Initiative team

Read More

Publications

Through the NOVA Door: A Process Evaluation of Shelby County’s Defending Childhood Initiative

Through the NOVA Door: A Process Evaluation of Shelby County’s Defending Childhood Initiative

By Elise Jensen and Rachel Swaner

The Shelby County Defending Childhood Initiative, known as the Network for Overcoming Violence and Abuse (NOVA), used a place-based approach to target children and families exposed to violence in three apartment complexes in the Frayser and Hickory Hill neighborhoods of Memphis. The initiative placed staff in apartment complexes to conduct outreach to children and families in need, and, through case management and advocacy, to refer families to necessary services for therapeutic treatment. Other project components included community awareness campaigns, professional training on topics such as children’s exposure to violence and data confidentiality, and the creation of a shared data management system. (April 2015)

Contact
  • New York
  • 520 8th Avenue
  • 18th Floor
  • New York, NY 10018
  • phone: 646.386.3100
  • Syracuse
  • 601 Tully Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13204
  • phone: 315.266.4330
  • London
  • Canterbury Court
    1-3 Brixton Road
  • London, SW9 6DE
  • phone: +44 2076.329.060