Juvenile Justice

Articles

Combating the Contagion of Violence: Learning from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Program

Combating the Contagion of Violence: Learning from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Program

The COPS Office's Patrice Howard and Lt. Roman Murrietta of the Sacramento Police Department discuss how the violence prevention initiative has enhanced community policing.The COPS Office's Patrice Howard and Lt. Roman Murrietta of the Sacramento Police Department discuss how the violence prevention initiative has enhanced community policing.

SAVANNAH, Ga., March 31, 2017 — Representatives from the nine sites participating in the federal Minority Youth Violence Prevention initiative gathered in Savannah, Georgia to share accomplishments, learn from common challenges, and plan for how best to carry the work forward.

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Articles

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

By Warren A. Reich

In this study 812 youths arraigned on juvenile delinquency charges in New York City and placed under community supervision were screened for mental health disorders. Forty-eight percent of boys and 62% of girls flagged for possible mental health problems. The most frequently appearing flags, for mania and posttraumatic stress disorder, were comorbid with most other disorders. While youths who flagged on major depression, anxiety, or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder were at higher risk for re-arrest, those who flagged for separation anxiety or suicidal ideation were actually less likely to be re-arrested. Published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation and available here.

Articles

New York State’s Integrated Domestic Violence Court Model: Results from Four Recent Studies

New York State’s Integrated Domestic Violence Court Model: Results from Four Recent Studies

By Amanda Cissner, Sarah Picard-Fritsche and Michael Rempel

This article synthesizes findings from four recent studies examining the integrated domestic violence (IDV) court model. Based on a one family-one judge concept, the New York State court system has established more than 40 such courts across the state since 2001. These courts seek to achieve more informed judicial decision-making, fewer conflicting orders, improved service delivery to victims and their children, and a more efficient and comprehensible case processing system. Published in Domestic Violence Report.

To obtain this synthesis of four recent studies on integrated domestic violence courts, click here.

To obtain the full report on Suffolk County Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report on the Erie County Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report on interviews with litigants at the Yonkers Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report examining results in nine other domestic violence courts:

Articles

Adolescent Diversion Program:  The Court System Pilots a New Approach to Young Offenders

Adolescent Diversion Program: The Court System Pilots a New Approach to Young Offenders

NEW YORK, NY, March 1, 2012--In an effort to improve the judicial response to 16 and 17 year old offenders, the Center for Court Innovation is helping the New York State Court System pilot the Adolescent Diversion Program.

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Articles

Justice Center Partners with Police to Host Harlem Youth Fair

On September 17, 2009, the Harlem Community Justice Center, in collaboration with the New York Police Department, held a youth resource fair at the historic Harlem Armory. The fair was the brainchild of Lt. Kevin O’Connor of Patrol Borough Manhattan North, who asked the Justice Center in to help him with the fair.

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Articles

In-School Mediation: Conflict Resolution in a Brooklyn School

At New York City’s Middle School 61, high levels of conflict between students has been a chronic problem. The Crown Heights Community Mediation Center’s School Justice Center has worked intensively with schools to transform their culture and promote peaceful resolutions to conflict.

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Articles

Youth Justice Board Presents Recommendations on Permanency Planning

Youth Justice Board Presents Recommendations on Permanency Planning

The Center’s Youth Justice Board conducted a year-long study of New York City’s permanency planning process. The resulting report proposes 14 specific recommendations to improve the court experiences and outcomes for adolescents in foster care.

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Articles

Red Hook Photo Project

Red Hook Photo Project

In 2006, the Red Hook Youth Photography Project was developed as a response to community needs in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Over the course of a summer, young people use photography to express their feelings and questions about the world. At the end of the summer, all student portfolios are displayed in a show at the Red Hook Community Justice Center, giving participants an opportunity to be the subject of positive attention from their community.

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Articles

Youth Justice Board: Recommendations on Juvenile Reentry in New York City

Youth Justice Board: Recommendations on Juvenile Reentry in New York City

Launched in January 2004, the Youth Justice Board brings together young people from throughout New York City to propose solutions to the public safety issues that affect them and their peers. Shocked to learn that 75% of all youth released from state custody are rearrested within three years, the sixteen Board members—drawn from high schools throughout the city—spent nine months researching the topic of juvenile reentry.

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Articles

Spotlight on Juvenile Drug Court Technology

In the fall of 2002, the New York State Unified Court System unveiled new technology designed to support an experiment in judicial problem-solving—the Harlem Juvenile Intervention Court, a community-based juvenile drug court that links delinquent youth to drug treatment and services such as counseling, tutoring and positive social activities. The goal is to give young people the structure and support they need to avoid further criminal behavior.

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Articles

From Confinement to Community: Easing the Tension for Incarcerated Youth

I am the judicial hearing officer for the Harlem Community Justice Center’s Juvenile Reentry Network. I see first hand the difficulties faced by young people returning from placement to their community. I also see the challenges faced by our juvenile justice system, which is struggling to do right by these kids and the communities they live in.

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