Research

Publications

Homeless Not Hopeless: A Report on Homeless Youth and the Justice System in New York City

Homeless Not Hopeless: A Report on Homeless Youth and the Justice System in New York City

By Members of the Youth Justice Board

This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Youth Justice Board, a youth leadership program that gives teenagers an opportunity to inform public debate about issues that affect them. During the 2016-17 school year, members examined the intersection between youth homelessness and the justice system in New York City in order to identify opportunities to better support homeless youth, reduce their interactions with the justice system, and prevent homelessness in the future. Recommendations in the report include policy changes to improve diversion programs and access to housing for homeless youth, and to increase support for LGBTQ youth in foster care.

Video

Harlem Parole Reentry Court: A Graduation

Harlem Parole Reentry Court: A Graduation

New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr., and Judge Verna Saunders of the Harlem Community Justice Center celebrate the return to the community of participants in the Harlem Parole Reentry Court. In their remarks at a ceremony for program graduates, the speakers also highlight the value of reentry programs in helping the formerly incarcerated make successful transitions from prison to freedom.

Audio

Using Volunteers to Evaluate the Courtroom Experience: A Conversation about CourtWatch of King County, Wash.

Using Volunteers to Evaluate the Courtroom Experience: A Conversation about CourtWatch of King County, Wash.

Court observation programs around the country send volunteers into courts to observe, collect data, and sometimes issue reports about what they've seen. Their goals include keeping courts accountable to the public and improving transparency, but not all courts are eager to receive public feedback. CourtWatch of King County, Washington, has worked closely with its local courts since the program's founding, trying to build a relationship that is more collaborative than adversarial. As Laura Jones, manager, and Mary Laskowski, services and outreach coordinator, explain to New Thinking host Robert V. Wolf, this collaborative approach has allowed CourtWatch to support judges and court administrators in efforts to improve the court experience for everyone.

Articles

Combating the Contagion of Violence: Learning from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Program

Combating the Contagion of Violence: Learning from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Program

The COPS Office's Patrice Howard and Lt. Roman Murrietta of the Sacramento Police Department discuss how the violence prevention initiative has enhanced community policing.The COPS Office's Patrice Howard and Lt. Roman Murrietta of the Sacramento Police Department discuss how the violence prevention initiative has enhanced community policing.

SAVANNAH, Ga., March 31, 2017 — Representatives from the nine sites participating in the federal Minority Youth Violence Prevention initiative gathered in Savannah, Georgia to share accomplishments, learn from common challenges, and plan for how best to carry the work forward.

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Publications

Inspired by Peacemaking: Creating Community Based Restorative Programs in State Courts

Inspired by Peacemaking: Creating Community Based Restorative Programs in State Courts

By Erika Sasson and Nora Sydow

This document describes the Native American method of peacemaking—a non-adversarial form of justice focusing on restoration and the long-term healing of relationships—and offers detailed guidelines for implementation by state courts. The authors consider how incorporating peacemaking can help state courts strengthen public trust in justice by involving the community in settling disputes and help courts towards their goal of becoming more responsive to trauma in the populations they serve. The document profiles four peacemaking programs in state courts and concludes with stories of disputes brought before the Red Hook Peacemaking Program in Brooklyn, N.Y. Undertaken in collaboration with the National Center for State Courts, this document was prepared with support from the State Justice Institute.

Contact
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