Violence Prevention

The Center for Court Innovation seeks to reduce violence through a number of violence interruption and prevention projects. For example, in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, the Center has tested a public health approach to violence, adopting a model originally piloted in Chicago. In Brownsville, Brooklyn, the Center has started a program that brings together law enforcement and key community players to communicate a focused message to parolees that violence is unacceptable. The Center seeks to bring the lessons from these initiatives to other New York City neighborhoods, including the South Bronx. The Center for Court Innovation has also been collaborating with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) and The California Endowment to bring together police chiefs and public health experts to discuss how law enforcement and public health might share resources and strategies to prevent violence in communities across the country. 

Minority Youth Violence Prevention

The Center for Court Innovation is serving as the technical assistance provider for the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Initiative, a new collaboration between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's Office of Minority Health and the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services that seeks to engage public health organizations, law enforcement agencies, and community-based groups in an effort to curb violence and reduce disparities in access to public health among at-risk minority youth. Read more about the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Initiative here.

Save Our Streets (S.O.S.)

Save Our Streets seeks to end shootings in Brooklyn (in Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant) and the Bronx (in the South Bronx and Morrisania). Trained outreach workers—hired for their street credibility, their knowledge of the neighborhood, and the positive changes they have made in their own lives—work evenings and nights to mediate street conflicts before they escalate into violence. The program also organizes marches and vigils whenever a shooting occurs. For more information about S.O.S's work in Crown Heights, see the S.O.S. blog. The youth organizing arm of S.O.S., (YO S.O.S.) aims to empower young people in Crown Heights, ages 14 to 17, to become community leaders and organizers. Through a combination of experiential workshops and service learning opportunities, YO S.O.S. participants develop concrete leadership skills and real-world work experience. For more information, see the YO S.O.S. blog.

6 Feet Above

6 Feet Above is a multimedia anti-violence campaign created by Youth Organizing to Save Our Streets in collaboration with Urban Art Beat, Urban Arts Partnership, and Urban Word NYC. The initiative brings a vital youth voice to the anti-violence movement, and emphasizes peace, healing, safety, and community pride. Harnessing the talents of Brooklyn youth, 6 Feet Above has produced three video projects using hip-hop and spoken word poetry, One ShotWe Care, and a series of individual youth poems. Six Feet Above has been covered in the news by DNA Info and PIX 11. It can be found on Twitter as #6FeetAbove.

Publications

Defending Childhood

Defending Childhood

In order to address the high prevalence of children’s exposure to violence, in 2010, eight sites around the country were selected by the U.S. Department of Justice for the Defending Childhood Demonstration Program. This national initiative aims: 1) to prevent children’s exposure to violence; 2) to mitigate the negative impact of such exposure when it does occur; and 3) to develop knowledge and spread awareness about children’s exposure to violence, both within and beyond the chosen pilot sites. The eight demonstration sites are:

Listen to an interview with Center for Court Innovation researchers

Listen to an Interview with the Cuyahoga County Defending Childhood Initiative team

Listen to an Interview with the Grand Forks County Defending Childhood Initiative team

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Publications

Healthy Communities May Make Safe Communities: Public Health Approaches to Violence Prevention

Healthy Communities May Make Safe Communities: Public Health Approaches to Violence Prevention

By Sarah Schweig

Publication in the NIJ Journal No. 273 about how police chiefs, public health directors, and researchers are establishing innovative public health/public safety collaborations to fight crime. 

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Publications

Testing a Public Health Approach to Gun Violence

Testing a Public Health Approach to Gun Violence

By Sarah Picard-Fritsche and Lenore Lebron

This report presents the results of a comprehensive impact and process evaluation of the anti-violence initiative Save Our Streets, which started in Crown Heights, Brooklyn in 2010. Results demonstrate that the initiative had a statistically significant impact on gun violence trends in Crown Heights when compared with three similar precincts in Brooklyn. 

Publications

Deterrence and Legitimacy in Brownsville, Brooklyn: A Process Evaluation of the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

Deterrence and Legitimacy in Brownsville, Brooklyn: A Process Evaluation of the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

By Sarah Picard-Fritsche, Rachel Swaner and Suvi Hynynen

This report documents a gun violence prevention program and finds high levels of cynicism regarding the fairness and effectiveness of the justice system among residents of the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn.

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Interviews

Connections Among People: Tracking and Preventing Violence through Social Network Analysis

Connections Among People: Tracking and Preventing Violence through Social Network Analysis

Sociologist Andrew Papachristos focuses his studies on urban neighborhoods, social networks, street gangs, violent crime, and gun violence. As a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard University, Andrew will expand his use of network analysis to study crime in U.S. cities, paying particular attention to the way violence diffuses among populations of youth. During a break in a roundtable on collaborations between public health and public safety, he discusses how social network analysis can aid crime prevention.

 

Most Popular Research

Publications

The U.S. Attorney General’s Defending Childhood Initiative: Formative Evaluation of the Phase I Demonstration Program

The U.S. Attorney General’s Defending Childhood Initiative: Formative Evaluation of the Phase I Demonstration Program

By Rachel Swaner and Julia Kohn

This report describes the nature and scope of children's exposure to violence in eight sites nationwide that were selected to participate in the Attorney General's Defending Childhood demonstration program. This report describes the strategies the sites chose and draws key lessons from the planning phase. 

Publications

Love One Another and Take Care of Each Other: A Process Evaluation of the Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project

Love One Another and Take Care of Each Other: A Process Evaluation of the Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project

By Lama Hassoun Ayoub

Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project was informed by a commitment to culture as prevention—reconnecting youth and families with the Chippewa Cree language, culture, and traditions. The primary components of the initiative were advocacy and case management for children and families coping with exposure to violence; crisis intervention services; treatment referrals; traditional healing ceremonies; and community awareness and education activities. (April 2015)

Publications

Nawicakiciji – Woasniye – Oaye Waste: A Process Evaluation of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe’s Defending Childhood Initiative

Nawicakiciji – Woasniye – Oaye Waste: A Process Evaluation of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe’s Defending Childhood Initiative

By Rachel Swaner

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe Defending Childhood Initiative incorporated the Lakota way of life in all of its programming and approaches and viewed bringing back Lakota culture as a form of prevention work. The Rosebud DCI model focused heavily on providing case management services for children who have been exposed to violence. Staff facilitated traditional healing ceremonies and made referrals to culturally appropriate treatment, as well provided court- and school-based advocacy. Additionally, the initiative focused on bringing awareness about children’s exposure to violence and available resources to the different communities and schools on the reservation. Finally, staff worked to revise tribal legislation and policy to be more responsive to children’s exposure to violence. (April 2015)

Contact
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